Online Payments

If You Are Considering Joint Replacement Surgery, Make Sure To Consider The Training, Experience And Credentials Of The Physicians Performing The Procedure

Joint replacement is a surgical procedure in which parts of an arthritic or damaged joint are removed and replaced with a metal, plastic or ceramic prosthesis. The prosthesis is designed to replicate the movement of a normal, healthy joint. With new materials and procedures evolving at a frenetic pace, it is important be sure that your physicians remain up to date on the very latest medical technologies. Active Orthopedics and Sports Medicine’s joint replacement surgeons – Dr. Gross, Dr. Vazquez, Dr. Giuffrida, and Dr. John – are board certified and have completed fellowship training at the most prestigious medical institutions in the country. Their experience and the record of positive outcomes achieved by their patients is unmatched anywhere.

Active Orthopedics & Sports Medicine surgical patients typically enjoy a fast recovery time and less pain. Trained in the latest minimally invasive procedures, our surgeons are able to perform most procedures right in our office – even total hip and knee replacements.

• Anterior Hip Replacement
• Total Hip Replacement
• Hip Resurfacing
• Total And Partial Knee Replacement
• Knee Resurfacing
• Total Wrist Replacement
• Total Elbow Replacement
• Shoulder Joint Replacement
• Advanced Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement

Michael L. Gross, MD
Sports Medicine
Read Full Bio

Oscar Vazquez, MD
Sports Medicine
Read Full Bio

A. Ylenia Giuffrida, MD
Hand, Wrist & Elbow
Read Full Bio

Thomas K. John, MD
Joint Replacement
Read Full Bio

We’ve Been Getting Northern New Jersey Back In The Game Since 1994

Make an appointment
See how our board certified and fellowship trained experts can help you.

Anterior Hip Replacement

Regain Mobility

Contact Us >

A damaged hip can make everyday activities such as walking, getting in and out of a chair, or putting on socks and shoes extremely painful and difficult. It can even make just sitting uncomfortable. If you have been putting off surgery because of the length of recovery time, our surgeons have an option you may want to consider. You may be a candidate for a less invasive hip procedure, which can be performed in our office and gets you on your feet faster than the traditional approach.

Candidates

If your hip is damaged as a result of an injury, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or avascular necrosis, you could be a candidate for the anterior approach. Patients who are severely overweight, are muscular, have a wide pelvis, or who have implants or metal hardware in the hip from a prior surgery may not be well-suited for this procedure. Our surgeons will take a complete health history to determine if this procedure is right for you.

Procedure

Anterior hip replacement is a newer, minimally invasive alternative to the traditional hip replacement approach. This procedure involves cutting a four-inch incision through the front, rather than the leg. The anterior approach provides the surgeon with a better view of the hip socket and preserves the muscles. By entering the leg from the front, the surgeon can reach the hip joint by separating the muscles, rather than cutting and reattaching them. Because the incision is so small, the procedure can be sometimes be done as an outpatient, avoiding needless admission to the hospital.

Advantages

The anterior approach has several advantages over the traditional posterior procedure. The smaller incision means more rapid recovery. Patients can bend at the hip and bear weight as soon as it is comfortable. Since the muscles are simply separated rather than cut, patients typically experience less pain after surgery. And because the muscles and soft tissue are not disturbed, patients have better range of motion and decreased chance for hip dislocation.

Total Hip Replacement

Helping You To Restore Mobility

Contact Us >

Do you have trouble getting up and down stairs, are unable to sleep because of pain radiating from your hip, have difficulty getting up from a seated position, or suffer from stubborn hip pain that is not alleviated by medications? If so, it is likely that your hip joint is damaged due to osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or injury. The surgeons at Active Orthopedics & Sports Medicine LLC can help relieve your pain, increase motion, and get you back to enjoying everyday activities with a total hip replacement.

Candidates

You may benefit from total hip replacement surgery if you have pain that limits everyday activities, such as bending or walking; pain while resting; stiffness that limits your ability to lift or move your leg; or pain that doesn’t respond to anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, or walking supports. Recommendation for a total hip replacement is based on pain and disability. Anterior hip replacement may not be suited for patients who are obese or muscular, have a wide pelvis, or who have implants from a prior surgery.

Recovery

After surgery, a multimodal pain protocol is used to minimize pain and minimize dependency on narcotic medications. Movement, such as walking and light activity, play a key role in recovery. Using either the anterior or posterolateral approaches allow the patient to stand as soon as a few hours after surgery. Whichever procedure you undergo, a physical therapist will teach you specific exercises to strengthen your hip and restore movement to the joint.

Procedure

The hip is a ball and socket joint. The socket is formed by a part of the pelvis bone called the acetabulum. The ball is the head of the femur, which is at the upper end of the thigh bone. This ball and socket are covered by cartilage, a smooth tissue that cushions the ends of the bones and enables them to move easily. When the cartilage wears away or is damaged, the bones rub against each other, causing hip pain and stiffness. Total hip replacement surgery removes the damaged bone and cartilage and inserts prosthetic components to restore the hip’s alignment and function.

Our surgeons perform two types of total hip replacement procedures – the minimally invasive posterolateral approach and the minimally invasive anterior approach. Both techniques allow for rapid recovery and can be done in the outpatient setting. In a minimally invasive posterolateral approach total hip procedure, a 4 to 6-inch incision is made at the side of the hip. The surgeon dislocates the joint, removes the damaged femoral head, and places a metal stem in the center of the femur. A metal or ceramic ball, which replaces the damaged head, is placed on the upper part of the stem. The socket’s damaged cartilage surface is removed and replaced with a metal socket. To allow for a smooth, gliding surface, a plastic, metal, or ceramic spacer is inserted between the new ball and socket. The muscle and soft tissues are repaired, and the skin back together using the latest techniques in reduced tissue trauma surgery.

Hip Resurfacing

Feel Capable Again

Contact Us >

If advanced arthritis causes unbearable hip pain and prevents you from participating in activities that you enjoy, you may be able to find relief and get back to your life without undergoing a total hip replacement. Our surgeons perform an alternative procedure called hip resurfacing.

Candidates

Hip resurfacing is not suitable for all patients. Generally, the best candidates for this procedure are those who are younger than 60-years-old with a larger frame and strong, healthy bones. Older patients, who are smaller-framed with weak or damaged bone are at a higher risk of complications, such as a fracture of the femoral neck. Our experienced surgeons will help you determine if you are a good candidate for hip resurfacing.

Procedure

In a total hip replacement, both the head of the thigh bone, also called the femoral head, and the damaged socket are removed and replaced with plastic, metal, or ceramic components. In hip resurfacing, the femoral head is not removed, but rather preserved. It is reshaped and capped with a smooth metal covering. The socket’s damaged bone and cartilage are then replaced with a metal shell.

Advantages

Because hip resurfacing preserves the bone, this procedure offers several advantages over total hip replacement. Over time, the components used in any hip replacement wear or loosen. This wear and tear may necessitate an additional operation. Since hip resurfacing removes less of the femur than a total hip replacement, it is easier to exchange the components, increasing the chances of a successful procedure. Hip resurfacing also allows for a much larger ball size. This provides for greater stability of the hip joint, decreasing the risk of dislocation.

Total and Partial Knee Replacement

Enjoy Daily Activities Again

Contact Us >

The knee is a powerhouse. When it fails, it affects an entire body chain from the pelvis to the foot. This joint, which bears most of the weight of the body, is actually comprised of two joints. One connects the femur, the longest bone in the body, to the tibia, the second longest bone. The other joint connects the femur to the knee cap. The meniscus, a soft cartilage between the femur and tibia, serves as a cushion, helping to absorb shock during motion. These joints work together to form a hinge that allows the knee to bend and straighten, as well as rotate from side to side. Arthritis, injury, or disease can damage the joint and/or the meniscus, causing extreme pain and difficulty in performing everyday activities. Our surgeons help relieve that pain and get patients back to enjoying life with a rapid recovery knee replacement.

Candidates

If you have injured your knee, or have advanced osteoarthritis, and nonsurgical treatment options do not relieve your symptoms, you may be a candidate for knee replacement surgery. For partial knee replacement to be an option, your injury or arthritis must be limited to one compartment of the knee. Our surgeons will examine the knee, focusing on from where your pain radiates. If your pain is located on either the inside or outside of the knee, you may be a candidate for a partial procedure. If, however, you suffer from pain throughout your entire knee or in the front of the knee, you may be better suited for a total knee replacement. Additionally, if the surgeon finds your knee too stiff, or if the ligaments feel weak or torn, or you experience inflammatory arthritis, you may not be eligible for the partial procedure.

Advantages of Partial Knee Replacement

Because a partial knee replacement resurfaces only one compartment, there are several advantages to this procedure over total knee replacement: faster recovery time, less pain after surgery, and less blood loss, which means it is commonly done in the outpatient setting. Since the bone, cartilage, and ligaments of the other parts of the knee are kept intact, many patients report that a partial knee replacement feels more natural than a total knee replacement, and that it bends better.

Procedure

There are two types of knee replacement procedures to relieve pain and restore alignment and function of the knee: total and partial. In a total knee replacement, the damaged bone and cartilage are resurfaced. The surgeon makes an incision to expose the knee joint. The damaged part of the femur is cut, then a component is attached to the end of the femur. The damaged part of the tibia and cartilage are cut or shaved to remove the damaged part of the bone and allow for a smooth surface to which to attach the implants. A component is then attached to the tibia. An artificial surface is placed between the two components to replace the cushioning meniscus. Everything is put together to form the new knee joint.

The knee is divided into three major compartments: media (the inside part of the knee), lateral (the outside part of the knee), and patellofemoral (the front of the knee between the knee cap and femur). Patients whose damage or disease is limited to one area may benefit from a partial knee replacement, also called knee resurfacing, where only the affected portion of the knee is resurfaced. To determine if this alternative is a viable option, the surgeon will make an incision in the front of your knee and explore the three components to determine the extent of the damage. If indeed the damage is limited to one compartment, you will undergo a partial knee replacement. The damaged bone and cartilage will be removed and replaced with metal coverings that recreate the joint surface. A plastic component will be placed between the two metal coverings to create a smooth, gliding surface.

Total Wrist Replacement

Regain Function

Contact Us >

Arthritis or a traumatic injury can weaken your wrist, resulting in severe pain, diminished grip strength, limited hand use, decreased range of motion, and impediment to everyday activities. Wrist replacement surgery can help you regain strength and provide the wrist movement and stability needed to live an active life – and it can be done as an outpatient.

Candidates

Not everyone is a candidate for total wrist replacement. If you suffer from pain and reduced function in the hand and wrist due to severe osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or post-traumatic arthritis that does not respond to pain relievers, cortisone injections, or splinting, this procedure may be an option for you. It is not, however, recommended for those who use the wrist to meet the heavy demands of labor or contact sports.

Replacement vs. Fusion

A total wrist replacement involves restoring function to the wrist by removing damaged bone and cartilage and replacing them with metal and polyethylene components. As mentioned above, this is not an option for those who heavily utilize their wrist every day. A better option for those patients who need more wrist strength would be wrist fusion. In this procedure, the carpal bones in the hand are permanently fused with a metal plate to the radius. Fusion, however, limits mobility and dexterity. Fusion patients may experience difficulty with tasks that require finger dexterity, such as typing or playing an instrument.

Procedure

The wrist is a complicated joint. The base of the hand contains two rows of bones. There are four bones, called carpals, in each of those rows. Long, thin bones radiate out from the carpals to form the basis of the fingers and thumb. The forearm’s radius and ulna bones form a joint with the first row of the carpals. Cartilage covers the ends of the bones, creating a slick surface that allows the bones to smoothly move. If the cartilage is worn away or damaged, the bones rub against each other, causing wear, resulting in painful arthritis.

During a wrist replacement procedure, the degenerated parts of the wrist bones are replaced with polyethylene and metal components. An incision is made in the back of the wrist. The surgeon then removes the damaged ends of the lower arm bones (radius and ulna). Depending upon the damage, the first row of carpal bones may also be removed. The radial component is inserted into the center of the radius bone. A distal component is then attached to the hand bones. The distal component has a globe-shaped piece of metal that fits into the plastic socket of the radial component. This new ball and socket joint improves wrist function. A spacer is inserted between the metal components for cushioning.

Total Elbow Replacement

Get Back In The Swing Of Things

Contact Us >

The elbow is very susceptible to repetitive, overuse injuries and arthritis because it rarely gets an opportunity to rest. It is used countless times throughout the day. Chronic pain or injury/fracture in this area can have a drastic impact on your entire life. Simple tasks like driving, opening doors, even shaking hands can feel impossible – not to mention activities involved in an active lifestyle. Fortunately, our experienced orthopedic specialists have the expertise needed to ease your pain and get you back to your normal routines with a total elbow replacement.

Candidates

Total elbow replacement may be necessary when one or more of the elbow bones are severely fractured. If those bones are shattered, it may not be possible to put them back in place. The procedure is also recommended for those whose severe arthritis has not responded to conservative treatment options like medications or steroid injections. Our surgeons will evaluate your situation to determine if you are a good candidate for elbow replacement.

Recovery and Outcome

Pain immediately after surgery is to be expected, but can be managed with medications. Your surgeon will help plan a rehabilitation program, which will be key to surgical success. You will be taught exercises to control stiffness and swelling. Typically, you will not be able to put weight on your arm or push with your hand for about 6 weeks after surgery. Upon recovery, you should experience an improved quality of life – less pain, better function, and improved strength and motion – and be able to return to your regular routines. You may want to avoid activities and contact sports with a major risk of falling or heavy lifting, which can increase the risk of the replacement components loosening or breaking.

Procedure

The elbow is a hinge joint comprised of three bones: the humerus (upper arm bone), ulna (forearm bone on the pinking finger side), and radius (forearm bone on the thumb side). These bones meet to form the elbow. The surface where the bones come together is covered with cartilage, which protects the bones and enables them to easily move. A thin tissue covers the other surfaces within the joint. It makes fluid that lubricates the cartilage and eliminates friction. The joint is held together by muscles, ligaments, and tendons.

In a total elbow replacement, also referred to as total elbow arthroplasty, the damaged parts of the humerus and ulna are removed and replaced with an artificial joint made of a metal and plastic hinge with two metal stems that fit inside the hollow part of the bone. The surgeon makes an incision on the back side of the elbow, and gently moves the muscles, tendons, and ligaments aside to access the bone. Special care is taken to move the ulnar nerve to prevent damage. Any scar tissue or spurs around the joint are removed. The humerus and ulna are prepared for the artificial components. The metal replacement stems are inserted into the humerus and ulna bones and connected by a hinge pin. The skin is then stitched together and dressed.

Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement

Helping To Relieve Pain

Contact Us >

Arthritis or injury to the shoulder can cause chronic, debilitating pain. When there is soft tissue damage involving the rotator cuff, it may be extremely painful to lift the arm above the shoulder to perform such daily activities as bathing or dressing. Sometimes this damage is too severe to be repaired by a traditional total shoulder replacement. But that doesn’t mean you need to live with the pain. The surgeons at Active Orthopedics & Sports Medicine routinely an alternative procedure called reverse total shoulder replacement. It is a safe an effective way to relieve pain and restore function and mobility to those suffering from severe shoulder damage.

Candidates

Total shoulder replacement provides the best chance of rapid recovery of shoulder comfort and the ability to perform daily living activities. There are different types of shoulder replacement procedures. Our surgeons will carefully evaluate your situation to identify the best option for you. Patients with bone-on-bone osteoarthritis and intact rotator cuff tendons are typically good candidates for conventional total shoulder joint replacement. If you have completely torn rotator cuffs with severe arm weakness, have severe arthritis with rotator cuff tearing, or have had a previous shoulder replacement that failed, you are a candidate for a reverse total shoulder replacement. A conventional total shoulder replacement could leave those patients with pain and limited mobility.

Recovery and Outcome

Pain immediately after surgery is to be expected, but can be managed with medications. Your surgeon will help plan a rehabilitation program, which will be key to surgical success. You will be taught exercises to control stiffness and swelling. Typically, you will not be able to put weight on your arm or push with your hand for about 6 weeks after surgery. Upon recovery, you should experience an improved quality of life – less pain, better function, and improved strength and motion – and be able to return to your regular routines. You may want to avoid activities and contact sports with a major risk of falling or heavy lifting, which can increase the risk of the replacement components loosening or breaking.

Procedure

The shoulder is comprised of three bones: humerus (upper arm bone), scapula (shoulder blade), and clavicle (collarbone). The head of the humerus fits into a shallow socket in the scapula to create a ball and socket joint. The surface where the three bones touch are covered with cartilage, which protects them and enables them to easily move. A thin tissue covers the remaining surfaces of the joint. Muscles and tendons surround the shoulder, providing it stability and support.

In a shoulder joint replacement procedure, the surgeon makes an incision between the deltoid and the pectoralis muscles on the front of the shoulder. The muscles are separated to access the bones. Any adhesions are released, and bone spurs and damaged areas are removed. The surface of the humerus head is replaced with a metal ball with a stem that is inserted inside the humerus, and a crafted socket is fit into the scapula. Any other structure damage identified will then be repaired.